Kings, royal families and government officials had private armies and bodyguards who practiced a type of martial art known as KoongJoong MuSool.

These royal court martial arts gave rise to esoteric techniques of easily portable weapons such as short swords and folding fans. Also developed were unique weaponless techniques of joint-locking and pressure point striking.


Existing records in Japan suggest that many KoongJoong MuSool techniques found their way there and gave birth to the Japanese art of Jujitsu.

King JinHung of the Kingdom of Silla encouraged the HwaRang warriors to practice KoongJoong MuSool in addition to their other martial arts training. But later during the Koryo Dynasty and Chosun Dynasty, Korean kings enforced policies to discourage the practice of martial arts and to forbid the possession of weapons, in order to protect themselves from military rebellion or any other political uprising.

However, Korean martial arts have continued to develop both within and without the royal courts, thanks to the efforts of many dedicated Korean martial artists to practice, record, and compile these precious martial art techniques.